Lectures and Audio Vision: An overview of the dates

Numerous lectures, audiovisual productions and the Photosuisse award ceremony will take place over the four days of the exhibition. When is what? An overview.

Thursday May 26, 2022

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 18 p.m., Audio Vision blocks in the Füürwehrsaal at 13.00 p.m., 13.45 p.m., 14.30 p.m. and 15.15 p.m

10.30 Lecture: Marco Felix, tips for travel photography parish hall
11.00 Lecture: Thomas Kern, The emergence of a portrait series Fürwehrhaus
12.00 Lecture: Andreas Zimmermann, m.object parish hall
13.00 Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon innovations parish hall
14.30 Lecture: Thomas Biasotto, MASSIVE parish hall
16.00 Lecture: Patric Vigato, EIZO, color management parish hall
16.30 Lecture: Martin Bissig, Extremely on the move Fürwehrhaus
17.00 Lecture: Christian Reding, Get a taste of photo technology parish hall

Friday 27st May 2022

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 18 p.m., Audio Vision blocks in the Füürwehrsaal at 13.00 p.m., 13.45 p.m., 14.30 p.m. and 15.15 p.m

11.00 Lecture: Harry Lieber (DE), The beauty behind the obvious Fürwehrhaus
11.00 Lecture: Oliver May, EIZO, color management parish hall
12.00 Lecture: Andreas Zimmermann, m.object parish hall
13.00 Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon innovations parish hall
14.30 Lecture: Mary Farinello, bookfactory Software parish hall
19.00 Multivision: Andreas Zimmermann, totally crazy Fürwehrhaus

Saturday, May 28, 2022

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 18 p.m., Audio Vision blocks in the Füürwehrsaal at 13.00 p.m., 13.45 p.m., 14.30 p.m. and 15.15 p.m

11.00 Lecture: Mathias Kniepeiss (AT), The magic of the moment Fürwehrhaus
11.00 Lecture: Oliver May, EIZO, color management parish hall
12.00 Lecture: Andreas Zimmermann, m.object parish hall
13.00 Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon innovations parish hall
14.00 Award ceremony PHOTOSUISSE 2021 Auditorium school building Schlossmatt
14.30 Lecture: Marco Felix, tips for travel photography parish hall
16.30 Lecture: Olivier Morin (FR), Arctic Fun Fürwehrhaus

Sunday May 29, 2022

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 17 p.m., Audio Vision blocks in the Füürwehrsaal at 13.00 p.m., 13.45 p.m., 14.30 p.m. and 15.15 p.m

10.30 Lecture: Christian Reding, Get a taste of photo technology parish hall
11.00 Lecture: Werner Richner (DE), Between heaven and earth Fürwehrhaus
12.00 Lecture: Andreas Zimmermann, m.object parish hall
13.00 Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon innovations parish hall
14.30 Lecture: Christian Burkhardt & Filipp Rechsteiner, Bookfactory parish hall
16.00 Raffle for the winners of the visitor competition Schlossgutsaal

Interview with Thomas Kern: "I just come to you as a person."

For the series "Je te regarde et tu dis" Thomas Kern photographed 61 people from all areas of the canton of Fribourg. In the interview he talks about the creation of the series, his working method and the selection of the portrayed.

Thomas Kern, you are at home in Aargau, but for the 12th edition of the "Photographic investigation: Freiburg theme" you portrayed the people of Freiburg for a whole year. how come

I have to digress a bit. The Enquête Photographique Fribourgeoise is a competition that I have known for a long time. However, I didn't realize for a long time that it was also open to photographers from outside the canton and that I could apply there. After my exhibition about Haiti in 2017, I didn't have any major projects. So I found it interesting to apply here.

So you were looking for a topic.

Yes. It wasn't that easy, because I'm not from Freiburg. I don't have a large income. It quickly became clear to me that I wanted to do portraits - because I just like doing it. I didn't want to impose a theme on the whole thing, though. For example, I didn't want to photograph a certain ethnic group or a certain type of people. I wanted to leave that open. When applying, the great art was to describe the project on three pages in a comprehensible way without telling the jury which people in the canton of Friborg I would ultimately be photographing. At the time, I didn't even want to know myself, I just wanted to leave it to chance.

So how did you choose the people for your portraits?

As part of my research, I read a book by Jean-François Haas, a writer from Fribourg. In these novellas, Haas unspectacularly described the lives of random people in very beautiful stories. I immediately had the feeling that they were from Freiburg, even though it wasn't declared anywhere. That was like a guide for me. So I started with him. Then I had a few more people to connect with. For example, a tobacco farmer I once did a report about. I asked these people to pass me on to someone next. About 80 percent of the contacts came about through references.

Elsewhere you mentioned the concentration between you and the sitter. What do you mean by that?

When photographing, a moment should arise in which there is nothing between me and the photographed person. No image, no mask. I wanted to get as close to the people as possible. Create a common focus. It was important to me that people's views were unobstructed. Because that allows viewers to look inside the images. As soon as I take a portrait where the facial expression is the result of an interaction between me and that person, then as a photographer I own that moment. However, I wanted the people looking at these pictures to be able to look inside the pictures. And that the people I photographed look at the viewers exactly as they looked at me.

How is it possible to achieve this concentration?

This is very individual, there is no recipe. It was important to me that I talked to people about the project beforehand: I'll come to your house and there's no reason. Except that someone called your name. We don't know each other and I don't want you to represent anything - even if you're in a football club, I won't come and photograph you as a footballer. I just come to you as a human. I want to leave everything else out of the picture. People understood that.

What role does technology play here?

I took the pictures analogue, that was clear to me for various reasons. On the one hand, I grew up with it. It's a technique that doesn't scare me. On the other hand, as a photographer, it forces me to be more careful, especially with portraits. It's a slower process. After twelve frames I have to change the film. The rhythm is different than when I expose 1500 images. It's also important: I don't have to see what I'm doing and, above all, I don't want the person portrayed to see what I'm doing.

We are all constantly being photographed these days. So much so that taking pictures is no longer perceived as the actual action. But if you take pictures so slowly, then it suddenly becomes an act. That leads people to the moment when I say, "Now, that's fine, the light is right, now don't think about anything".

How did you choose the location of the portrait and the position of the portrayed?

I didn't really care what background appeared in the picture. Nevertheless, my goal was always to take an interesting picture. Since I was working with natural light, the choice in terms of location was mostly minimal. I needed a bit of space and the light had to be there. So that's what happened. For posture I give very light instructions, watch the body language to see if the person is comfortable. At the end there are very few instructions. “Look into the camera, look directly, please shut your mouth”. I didn't want people to laugh because it's a strong gesture that immediately puts them at a certain distance.

To what extent were those portrayed able to have a say?

Actually, I didn't even ask her. Although I feel like it's something very collaborative we're doing. It was clear from the start that I would take the photo.

To the exhibition by Thomas Kern…

To the lecture by Thomas Kern…

Cover picture: © Luca Zanetti

Sports photographer Martin Bissig: "It's just as exhausting for me as it is for the athletes"

As an action and mountain bike photographer, Martin Bissig accompanies athletes on their adventures to remote corners of the world. At Photo Münsingen he is showing excerpts from the series "Facing K2" (Pakistan), "Chasing Trails" (Iran) and "Nekor - A Pilgrim Ride" (Tibet). In the interview, Bissig talks about his working methods, preparations and equipment.

Martin Bissig, you accompany athletes on their adventures. How do you prepare for such a mission?

A distinction must be made between material and physical preparation. With regard to the material, it's important that I know right from the start what I'm going to encounter, what it looks like on site and what my options are. For example, there is often no way to charge batteries for days. So I have to make sure that I can work autonomously during this time. That means: having enough memory cards and batteries with you, having the option of making a backup and so on. Then I always work with two cameras in case one fails. Also important are radios to talk to the athletes, or a drone. It's often difficult to get something like this when you're on the go.

What is the physical preparation like?

I travel a lot before the expedition. I don't train specifically, but I try to be in good physical shape all year round. It's just as physically demanding for me as it is for the athletes. When it comes to altitude, I have already acclimatized in a high-altitude tent at home. I prepare well, because if an athlete drops out during an expedition, that's part of the story. On the other hand, if I fail, there are no pictures. And I can't afford that.

What camera equipment do you work with?

I've been working with the Canon system completely mirrorless for three years - mainly because of the size and weight, which is very relevant for me. I always work with two cameras at the same time. I have a 15mm wide-angle lens on one, a superzoom on the other, currently a 24-240mm. It's important to me that I can cover the entire focal length range and don't have to change lenses. I have the cameras on a hip belt, so I'm ready at all times.

Who are the clients for these pictures, how is your work financed?

You have to differentiate: on the one hand there are the expeditions. I don't earn enough with these to be able to earn my living in Switzerland. Although the stories are published in fifteen to twenty countries at a time and are also financed by sponsors. On the other hand, I do a lot of commercial work, here in Switzerland and in neighboring countries. For bike manufacturers, backpack manufacturers, holiday destinations and so on. That's how I earn my money.

The expeditions I do are financed by sponsors, who then also receive part of the pictures. Or by athletes, who in turn covered this with sponsors. Partly also from tourist destinations where we are invited. And then I get a little kickback from the magazines in which we publish.

How do you work on site: are you a silent observer or do you arrange things?

On an expedition, I try to be as real and authentic as possible. I don't arrange anything, I don't set anything, but most of what happens happens that way. That means I'm really an observer. There are of course action scenes that we do two or three times to make it look cool, but I wouldn't arrange anything that doesn't correspond to reality.

What is involved in your work on site?

On an expedition like the one in Pakistan, that's a very large area that I cover in the form of a one-man show: I filmed, photographed, flew drones, did the sound. I also edited the film and distributed images to the magazines. On site, my working day starts early in the morning when I get up and the driver ends after a hard day of interviews.

Do you have a tip for photographers who want to get into extreme sports and action photography?

There is really only one thing: go out, do, have fun with what you like to do. Commercial success usually comes naturally afterwards. Although you have to say: it's a tough place, there are many existing and good photographers out there who already have a name. To get started, I suggest teaming up with an athlete. Or in the commercial sector to contact manufacturers of outdoor equipment. There are always cool, young brands that are also looking for cool young photographers.

To the exhibition by Martin Bissig…

To the lecture by Martin Bissig…

 

Impressions of Photo Münsingen 2019: pictures, videos and social media

Photo Münsingen 2019 is in full swing. First impressions can be found in the picture gallery, video interviews and further impressions on social media.

In the gallery and on Flickr we have photos of the vernissage and first impressions of Photo Münsingen 2019. To the gallery…

 

We report on the exhibition daily on Facebook. Various exhibitors speak in video interviews about their topics and Photo Münsingen. To the Photo Münsingen Facebook page ...

Lectures, guided tours, audio vision: an overview of the dates

Numerous guided tours and lectures will take place on the four exhibition days. When is what going on? An overview.

Thursday May 30, 2019

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 17 p.m.

10.30 Lecture: Walter Weber, Fuji - Kirchgemeindehaus
11.00 Lecture: Patrick Rohr - Füürwehrsaal
13.00 Guided tour: Adrian Moser - Schlossgutplatz
13.30 Guided tour: Wolfgang Wiesen (D) - Schlossallee

Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon - Kirchgemeindehaus

14.00 Guided tour: Alain Rivière-Lecoeur - Flower House

Guided tour: Christian Bobst - Parish Hall

14.30 Guided tour: Pascal Sentenac (F) - castle

Guided tour: Dominic Nahr - Schlossweg

15.00 Guided tour: Patrick Rohr - Castle

Lecture: Silvan Schär, Photo Zumstein - Kirchgemeindehaus

15.30 Guided tour: alex and felix - castle
16.00 Guided tour: Julie de Waroquier Castle
16.30 Guided tour: Elsbeth Stalder - Schlossgut Retirement Center

Panel discussion - Füürwehrsaal

17.00 Guided tour: Noemi Romano - youth center / cellar

Friday 31st May 2019

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 19 p.m.

10.30 Lecture: Walter Weber, Fuji - Kirchgemeindehaus
11.00 Lecture: alex and felix - Füürwehrsaal
13.30 Guided tour: Swissinstameet - Castle Park

Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon - Kirchgemeindehaus

14.00 Guided tour: Jürg Ramseier - Castle
15.00 Lecture: Silvan Schär, Photo Zumstein - Kirchgemeindehaus
19.00 Multivision: Katja and Josef Niedermeier: Füürwehrsaal
20.00 Guided tour: Noemi Romano - youth center / cellar
21.00 Concert: Josua Romano - youth center / cellar

Saturday June 1st

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 18 p.m.

10.30 Lecture: Walter Weber, Fuji - Kirchgemeindehaus
11.00 Lecture: Wolfgang Wiesen, - Füürwehrsaal
13.30 Guided tour: Wolfgang Wiesen - Schlossallee

Guided tour: Swissinstameet - Castle Park

Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon - Kirchgemeindehaus

14.00 Guided tour: Alain Rivière-Lecoeur - Flower House

Guided tour: Jürg Ramseier - Castle

14.30 Guided tour: Pascal Sentenac - castle

Guided tour: Dominic Nahr - Schlossweg

15.00 Lecture: Silvan Schär, Photo Zumstein - Kirchgemeindehaus
16.00 Guided tour: Julie de Waroquier Castle
16.30 Guided tour: Elsbeth Stalder - Schlossgut Retirement Center

Lecture: Dominic Nahr - Füürwehrsaal

17.00 Guided tour: Noemi Romano - youth center / cellar

Sunday June 2nd

Exhibitions and Photo Arena open from 10 a.m. to 17 p.m.

10.30 Lecture: Walter Weber, Fuji - Kirchgemeindehaus
11.00 Lecture: Adrian Moser - Füürwehrsaal
13.00 Guided tour: Adrian Moser - Schlossgutplatz
13.30 Guided tour: Swissinstameet - Castle Park

Lecture: Christian Reding, Nikon - Kirchgemeindehaus

14.00 Guided tour: Christian Bobst - Parish Hall
15.30 Guided tour: alex and felix - castle
16.00 Raffle of the winners of the visitor competition - Schlossgutsaal

The Audio Vision blocks in the Füürwehrsaal start daily at: 13.00:13.30 p.m., 14.00:14.30 p.m., 15.00:15.30 p.m., XNUMX:XNUMX p.m., XNUMX:XNUMX p.m., XNUMX:XNUMX p.m.

Interview with Dominic Nahr: "I am very close with my heart"

In the exhibition "Resources and Consequences", Dominic Nahr shows pictures from various crisis areas in Africa. Born in Heiden (AR) and raised in Hong Kong, the reportage photographer lived in Kenya for nine years. In the interview he talks about the idea behind the exhibition, the closeness to the people photographed and why he likes coming to Münsingen.

Your exhibition at Photo Münsingen is about the struggle for resources and the consequences thereof. What's the idea behind it?

For the past ten years I've photographed stories in Africa about resources: oil, gold, cassiterite, pasture, or water and fishing. I thought that for the outdoor exhibition, where you go from picture to picture, a compilation of pictures from different countries fits. Each picture contains a mini-story about this struggle for resources and the consequences of it. Especially in Switzerland, where the water is so pure, the topic fits. You can drink water anywhere. That is the first thing I noticed in Switzerland.

Have you specifically photographed conflicts over resources in Africa?

Many war zones are about resources. Congo, for example, that was my first assignment on this continent. The war is clearly taking place between different groups - government or militias - that are in control of the natural resources. So you are automatically on this topic. Or in the north of Kenya, where there are constant conflicts over pastureland.

How do you choose the places to visit?

Most of the time I go to a place because a story is developing there. With many of these stories you have to be very quick so that you are the first to be there and take the pictures. But it's different every time. Sometimes I have to travel very far to take a picture. Sometimes I get there quickly. And sometimes I have to wait five days to get access.

That means you hear something or get an order and drive off ...

Both. Often I just left. Logistics is a big part of my reporting work. Taking the picture is only a very small part of my job. First of all, I have to research the story, even know what is going on. Have contacts who can give me the latest information. Then travel there - how do I get there? Are there roads or do you have to go there by helicopter? Can the plane land even though it is the rainy season? It's always a little different. In Somalia, for example, I had fifteen bodyguards so I wouldn't get kidnapped. In other places you only have one person with you so that you are as little conspicuous as possible.

What camera equipment do you use?

I've been working with small cameras for a number of years, especially the Leica M series viewfinder cameras. Traveling with these cameras is much less noticeable and allows me to disappear better - I appear less threatening. I like to work with the viewfinder and manual focus, so I'm more in the scene. I have to think twice, constantly adjusting the focus - being aware of my surroundings and being completely immersed in them.

Your pictures seem very respectful. How do you do that?

I think after so many years in Africa I have an understanding of what pictures I can take to tell the stories with respect. The colors and compositions should not only make the pictures of Africa look terrible. Even if many things are terrible, they should also show Africa's inner strength. That's why I stayed. Because I fell in love with the countries of East Africa, with the soil, the kitchen, the people, this energy. Living in Kenya was one of the most important factors in being close to the stories of East Africa and the entire continent.

How do you manage to get close and respectful to people?

If you are open with people, then they are open too. I think it's a partnership. You are vulnerable yourself and people notice that and open up. But the compositions and the light are also important to me, so that it harmonizes in the picture. And a little distance is also good, physically I mean, not with the heart. I am very close with my heart. Robert Capa said yes: "If your pictures aren't good enough, you're not close enough". I think it has to do with the heart too.

When do you put the camera down?

I often put the camera down when it got too much. You realize who can continue and who needs a break. But I always stay as long as I can. When you are with people, you can also wait and see what happens. It's not about just taking a picture and then being satisfied. For example, I stay with a family into the night, if possible until everyone is asleep. Of course, I also put the camera down when I can do something and no one else is there to help.

Does that also mean getting to know each other?

Yes, by being open to people. I show myself as I am and hope that you do the same. As soon as that happens, I try to take a step back so that life can go on as if I were not there.

So you don't talk to people, you just watch ...

I communicate a lot with body language and with my eyes. I also watch how people talk. I often don't understand the language, but I often understand what they mean.

How did you learn to work as a reportage photographer?

I grew up in Hong Kong and quickly became a newspaper photographer there. Small reports, portraits ... I was always on the move, had a few jobs a day. This is good training for working for a newspaper. You are very busy, you learn to react quickly, think quickly, and quickly send out the pictures. The other is simple: I was interested, was curious.

Are you doing this work for yourself?

Yes, in any case. I never had to do that, I wanted to. But the motivation is also that you are at the front of the story, coming very close to reality. When you are in a war zone, you photograph how history is written. When you are the only photographer on site and take the pictures that will represent a certain event in fifty years, that's exciting. I often just thought I was shooting for history, not now. But that has changed in the last couple of years.

Do you know the moment you take a picture that it will be a great picture?

I know when I'm taking good pictures and when things aren't going so well. If it works properly, I won't even notice that I'm holding a camera in my hand. I'm so focused, you could hand me any camera. Everything is on autopilot: composition, exposure, focus ... everything works. I look through the camera. I've seen this a couple of times. I also don't like looking at the display. Maybe at the beginning of the day to see if I can still do it.

Back to Photo Münsingen: What is it about exhibiting here?

I used to work with a lot of magazines. And I always thought it would work. People will look at these pictures and somehow something will happen. But that didn't always happen: I told people things they already knew… Coming to Switzerland also has to do with the fact that I no longer want to think globally about the audience, but closer to the people. I want to reach more people who would otherwise not necessarily see these stories. And I noticed that the Swiss are very interested in these stories and these pictures. Photo Münsingen is a suitable size and I believe that there is particular interest in Photo Münsingen, where there are so many photographers.

What advice would you give to photographers who would like to learn how to photograph reportages in your way?

The most important thing is to be interested in a subject and story, not just being a photographer. If I were not a photographer, I would probably choose film or some other form of communication. Training is important to take photos as much as possible, make mistakes, try things out. And also study historical and contemporary photographers. For me it meant going to libraries and looking at photo books, getting to know different styles and compositions, and seeing how sequences work to tell a story in pictures.

Interview: Tobias Kühn

To the exhibition by Dominic Nahr ...
Dominic Nahr in the Photo Arena ...
Dominic Nahr's lecture ...

Photo Münsingen 2018 in the media

An excerpt from the media coverage of Photo Münsingen 2018:

 

 

Photo Münsingen 2018: This is what awaits you

Photo Münsingen 2018 is taking shape: the program is complete, the brochure is in print, the preparations are in progress. A first overview of the highlights.

Exhibitions
Henna and Arthur Honegger, Oh, Amiland!
A picture of the USA that only locals normally know.

Beat Mumenthaler, CLOSE TO YOUR SOUL
Portraits that give the impression of being able to look deeper into a life.

Lorenz Andreas Fischer, Alps
Melting glaciers, thawing mountain lakes, foggy landscapes or the onset of winter.

Janine Machiedo (D), SURREALITY
Surreal-bizarre worlds in moments that never happened.

Florian Spring, In the nest of the crocodiles
Report from the village of Kandinge in Papua New Guinea.

62 photo clubs from Germany and abroad
Club competition and exhibition on 'Move'.

> All exhibitions at a glance ...

 

Audio-vision, lectures, photo arena
Brazil - From Rio to the Amazon
Multivision with live commentary from Dr. Heiko Beyer (reservation required).

Panel discussion Instagram
Boris Baldinger speaks to Instagram photographers about the new medium.

Photo Arena 2018
Andrist to Zimmermann: 10 exhibitors show their pictures in the circular screen arena.

> All audio visions ...
> All lectures ...

Photo Münsingen 2017 in the media

An excerpt from the media coverage of Photo Münsingen 2017:

 

Surprise aux amis photographes francophones

Chers amis photographes

"Photo Münsingen" is incontestablement l'une des plus grandes manifestations photographique de Suisse.
Des photographes Suisses et internationaux y présentent leurs œuvres. De nombreux stages et des projection audiovisual enrichissent le program de cette rencontre photo située à proximité de Berne.

L'édition 2017, qui aura lieu du 25 au 28 may, réserve une belle surprise aux amis photographes francophones: plusieurs événements seront présentés en français en particulier le samedi 27 may:

11 am: Presentation "Work in progress" by Lea Lund and Erik K. Lieu: fire department
https://photomuensingen.ch/phm2017/vortraege/vortrag-2017-lea-lun-und-erik‑k/

12 pm: Visite guidée de l'exposition "Snow Monkey" de Dorota & Bruno Sénéchal. Lieu: Schlossallee
https://photomuensingen.ch/phm2017/ausstellungen/ausstellung-2017-dorota-bruno-senechal‑f/

13pm: Visit guidée de l'exposition "Le jazz au bout des doigts" de Sophie Le Roux. Lieu: Castle
https://photomuensingen.ch/phm2017/ausstellungen/ausstellung-2017-sophie-le-roux/

14pm: Visite guidée de l'exposition "Tokyo.7" du Collectif SGP & JCB. Lieu: Retirement home Bärenmatte
https://photomuensingen.ch/phm2017/ausstellungen/ausstellung-collectif_sgp_jcb/

16h: Presentation "La série photographique" by Jean-Christophe Béchet. Lieu: Bärenmatte retirement home
https://photomuensingen.ch/phm2017/vortraege/vortrag-2017-jean-hhristophe-bechet/

The visites guidées et les présentations sont gratuites.

Vendredi, May 26.05.2017, XNUMX:
9 am - 17 pm: Stage "Créer un" vrai "livre photo" by Jean-Christophe Béchet. Lieu: Bärenmatte retirement home.
Réservation à partir du 18.04.2017, 20pm à cette adresse https://en.xing-events.com/phm2017_24.html

The nombreuses d'expositions et ainsi que des projections audiovisuelles sont au programme visible ici: www.photomuensingen.ch

Nous nous réjouissons de vous accueillir à Photo Münsigen très prochainement.

Très cordialement
Rudolf Mäusli